The Living Thing / Notebooks :

Weaponised social media

Trolls, bots, lulz, infowars and other moods of the modern networked ape

Usefulness: 🔧
Novelty: 💡
Uncertainty: 🤪 🤪 🤪
Incompleteness: 🚧 🚧 🚧
Facebook selling elections
Facebook selling elections

Information warfare on the social information graph, for the purpose of human behaviour control, various notes to that theme.

The other side to trusted news; hacking the implicit reputation system of social media to suborn factual reporting, or to motivate people to behave to suit your goals.

Research in this area is notably terrible, possibly because our tools of causality on social graphs are weak and it is hard, or perhaps, because the tools that some of us have are really good but people with really good tools to control the public are not going to mention that.

How it could be done

Strategies in the wild

Sea-lioning is a common hack for trolls, and is a whole interesting essay in strategic conversation deraillment strategies. Here is one strategy against it, the FAQ off system for live FAQ.

Evaluating

How do you observational inference of these systems? Of course, standard survey modelling. There is some structure to exploit here, e.g. causalimpact? How about when the data is a mixture of time-series data and one-off results (e.g. polling before and election and the election itself)

Automatic trolling, infinite fake news

The controversial GPT-2 (Radford et al. 2019)

GPT-2 displays a broad set of capabilities, including the ability to generate conditional synthetic text samples of unprecedented quality, where we prime the model with an input and have it generate a lengthy continuation. In addition, GPT-2 outperforms other language models trained on specific domains (like Wikipedia, news, or books) without needing to use these domain-specific training datasets.

It takes 5 minutes to download this package and start generating decent fake news; Whether you gain anything voer the traditional manual method is an open question.

The controversial deepcom model enables automatic comment generation for your fake news. (Yang et al. 2019)

Assembling these into a twitter bot farm is left as an exercise for the student.

How it’s being done

Jonathan Stray, What tools do we have to combat disinformation?

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